7 Honey Interesting Facts

bee on flower

When we decided to create Tāima honey we had to do a lot of research. When we say a lot, we really mean a lot of research in so many different channels. You probably don’t want to do it all (unless if you are wanting to start bee-keeping we guess) but we came across these very interesting honey facts and we thought they were really cool. Check them out:

1. HONEY NEVER SPOILS.

When sealed in an airtight container, honey is one of the few foods known to have an eternal shelf life. There are even reports of edible honey being found in several-thousand-year-old Egyptian tombs. Honey’s longevity can be explained by its chemical makeup: The substance is naturally acidic and low in moisture, making it an inhospitable environment for bacteria.

A lot of hard work from bees goes into imbuing honey with these magical properties. While transforming nectar (honey’s main ingredient) into honey, bees flap their wings so hard that they draw excess moisture out of the initially water-filled substance. Bees also have a special enzyme in their stomachs that helps to break the nectar down into gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, the latter of which acts to further prevent the growth of bacteria and other organisms in the honey.

2. BEES MAKE A LOT OF HONEY.

A typical beehive can produce anywhere from 30 to 100 pounds of honey a year. To produce a single pound of honey, a colony of bees must collect nectar from approximately 2 million flowers and fly over 55,000 miles. This amounts to a lifetime’s worth of work for around 800 bees.

3. HONEY WAS A HOT COMMODITY IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE.

In the 11th century Germany, honey was so highly valued for its beer-sweetening abilities that German feudal lords required their peasants to make the payments of honey and beeswax.

4. HONEY IS MEDICINAL.

Evidence of honey being prescribed as a medical treatment dates back as far as ancient Mesopotamia. Because the substance is so inhospitable to bacteria, it was often used as a natural bandage to protect cuts and burns from infection. Today, honey is still used as a natural treatment for dandruff, stomach ulcers, and even seasonal allergies.

5. FOR BEES, A LITTLE HONEY GOES A LONG WAY.

On average, a honey bee produces 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey over the course of its life. To put that into perspective, two tablespoons of honey would be enough to fuel a bee’s entire flight around the world.

6. HONEY IS GOOD FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE ECONOMY.

The environment depends on the pollination that occurs when honey bees gather nectar. Bees pollinate $20 billion worth of U.S. crops each year, and approximately one third of all food eaten by Americans is either directly or indirectly derived from honey bee pollination.

7. BEES ARE A SURPRISINGLY VERSATILE FOOD SOURCE.
Though Westerners are still squeamish about using insects themselves as a source of protein, we seem to have no problem eating something that’s been regurgitated by them. And bees also provide us with Royal Jelly, beeswax, bee pollen, and other interesting and exotic foods.

This list is a credit of Mental Floss. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/68528/15-honey-facts-worth-buzzing-about